This is the second in our 3 part series on that will walk you step-by-step through the process of how to build a website from scratch. Each of these articles stand on their own. In this article, we will talk about the reasons one would use WordPress over any other platform out there. I will then walk you through the easy process of installing WordPress and the Divi Theme.

Below are the topics of discussion in this article. Feel you free to click on any one of the following links to skip to that section.

Why WordPress?

WordPress has been around since 2003 and has only grown in popularity. There are multiple reasons why it has grown so popular, and knowing why will give you both confidence and assurance when building your next website.

If I may, let me take 4 minutes of your time to show you why you should use WordPress as your platform of choice to develop your next website.

 

WordPress is Fun!

Building a website with WordPress allows you to be very creative without a lot of risk.

Being able to build a website quickly and easily using WordPress is just plain fun! Long gone are the days where you needed to learn languages like JavaScript, HTML, CSS, SQL and PHP in order to deliver highly functional websites.  With WordPress, you don’t have to worry about learning languages to build a website.   For example, if you mess up something, you can fix it fairly quickly.  No biggie.

I love being able to add plug-ins to make a website functional. With very little effort, you end up looking like you are a professional web developer, simply by applying a plug-in (usually free), to the website.  There is that feeling of accomplishment after creating your website all by yourself.  This makes building websites with WordPress all the more fun.  To hear your family and friends say, “Wait, YOU built this?”.  Gotta love it!

 

WordPress is by Far, the Most Popular CMS in the World

When WordPress was released in May of 2003, it was well received.  Prior to this, if one wanted to “blog”, they needed to use a software tool like, Dreamweaver, (now owned by Adobe), to post a blog article.  Actually, when it was first released, WordPress was primarily used as a blogging tool.

As already discussed, WordPress websites account for about 32% of all websites in the world, but did you know that 59% of all Websites that are based on content management systems, are WordPress websites?   1/3 of all websites today that were created within the last 15 years use WordPress.  That’s just impressive.  Joomla! accounts for just 5.6%, and Drupal holds just 3.6% .

Why is this significant?  This is important to know because it shows that WordPress has a LOT of momentum behind it.  It is not dying, (like Joomla! and Drupal, hHhhm . . . oh, excuse me ;-).  On the contrary, WordPress is growing, taking a greater market share with each passing year.

 

WordPress is Completely FREE

Because WordPress is ‘Open Source’, it is completely free. ‘Open Source’ means that anybody can contribute code to the development of the product itself. Free is good. This has no doubt added to the popularity of WordPress.

There are those, however, who think that it can’t possibly be good if it is free. That is just not true. If WordPress was not a Rock solid content management system (CMS), it would not be nearly as popular as it is. Though most great things in life are not free, WordPress is definitely one of them.  If you have not already tried using it, I highly encourage you to do so now, you won’t regret it.

 

WordPress is Extremely Flexible

One of the greatest things about WordPress is that it is incredibly flexible. There are literally thousands of WordPress templates that you can apply to your website.

Additionally, there are tens of thousands of different plugins you can use, (most of which are free), to meet your website needs.  In fact, you would be hard pressed not to find a WordPress plug-in to do what you need.  There are just so many out there, and chances are that if you have a need, someone else has that same need.

Given the popularity of WordPress, Plug-in developers LOVE WordPress.  They love WordPress because the more people that use WordPress, the greater the chance that people will use their plug-in.  For those who sell plug-ins, WordPress is very attractive.

WordPress is no longer thought of as simply a blogging site.

With WordPress, you can create all of the following types of websites, and even more. Here are several website ideas that I found on wpbeginner.com

  • A blogging website
  • A business website
  • An e-commerce website
  • A job-board website
  • A business directory website
  • A Q&A website
  • A non-profit or church website
  • A portfolio website
  • An online community website
  • A coupon website
  • An auction website
  • A multilingual website
  • A knowledge base or wiki website
  • A podcasting website
  • A niche affiliate website
  • A gallery website
  • A High school or college website

After installing Divi on your WordPress website, you can pretty much build anything you can imagine.

The WordPress platform is by far the most flexible CMS available today, as can be demonstrated by the numerous types of websites listed above that you can build with WordPress.

 

WordPress is Easy to Learn

With all due respect to my Mom, it’s so easy my Mom can do it!  In other words, you do not need to be a rocket scientist in order to use WordPress. There are no doctor degrees required, and best of all, you do not need to be a hard-core web-developer to deliver stunning functionality on your website.

Unlike Joomla! or Drupal, WordPress does not have a high learning curve.

These content management systems take weeks to learn and master. Not so with WordPress. In fact, learning WordPress is very easy. In all honesty, you can learn the basics of WordPress within an hour. If you can use Microsoft Word, you can use WordPress. Of course, the more you use it, the more proficient you become with it.

 

WordPress is Easy to Manage

A Content Management System allows or multiple people to be able to manage different parts of a given website, or at least different types of content.  WordPress is no exception.  If you are simply building this for yourself, or for someone else who will mange everything themselves, not to worry.  WordPress makes is very easy.  However, if you are building a company website where multiple people need different roles assigned to them so that the site can be maintained and where content can be submitted for approval, WordPress has you covered there as well.

WordPress allows for multiple users to manage different areas of the site, allowing the “Super Admin” to assign any one of the following roles to users to administer the website.  Incidentally, when you first install WordPress, the “WordPress login credentials” are the Super Admin login credentials.

Super Admin
This role is for the user who has the ability to administer every area of the website.

Administrator
This role can be assigned to the user who has access to all the administration features within a single site.

Editor
This person can publish and manage posts including the posts of other users.

Author
This role is assigned to the user  who can publish and manage their own posts.

Contributor
This role is assigned to someone who can write and manage their own posts but cannot publish them.

Subscriber
This role is assigned to participants of the website, usually “members” of the site who can log into the site.  They can only manage their profile.

 

WordPress is Mobile Friendly

In 2018, 52.2 percent of all website traffic worldwide was generated through mobile phones.  If you build a website that is not mobile friendly, you are missing 50% of the traffic you could have.  Fortunately, WordPress is 100% mobile friendly.  There is no need to use any special code to get your site to be “mobile compliant”.  It just works on mobile phones, period.

WordPress is not just mobile friendly on the front end, but on the back-end as well.  In their words, you can manage your site from your cell phone, (I personally do this all the time), and it’s FAST.

 

How to Install WordPress

I use SiteGround as my web host, and I host all of my sites with them.  If you want to know why I use SiteGround, you can read this article I wrote called, “10 Essential Questions to Ask When Choosing a Web-Host..” In it, I offer a detailed explanation to the question of why I use SiteGround as my web-host.  For demonstration purposes, lets take a look at how to create a mock-up site called, sgtutorials.com.

To begin, you will need to log into your Hosting account and click on the ACCOUNT tab, and then the red CPANEL button.  Once cPanel loads, scroll down the page until you come to the AUTOINSTALLERS section (see image below).

 

 

Once the page loads, click on the SOFTACULOUS icon, which will bring you to the following screen.

 

 

Here you will need to click on the big WORDPRESS icon, which will then bring you to the following screen.  At this point, you will want to click on the INSTALL tab.

 

 

Here you will need to enter the required fields for your site, which include the following:

  • Title
  • Description
  • Administrative username and password,
  • Administrative e-mail etc.

When entering the password, be sure to use a strong password to make sure your admin area is secure from brute force attacks.  When you have completed all of the required fields, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the INSTALL button, as shown below.

 

 

The automated installation process will proceed, which should take less than 60 seconds or so.  Once done you will see a page informing you of the successful completion of the installation.  Congratulations, you just installed WordPress! You should now see the following screen.

You can use the Administrative URL link to automatically log in your newly installed WordPress application, but before you click away, I highly recommend that you bookmark these two URL’s.  The one is see your website, and the other URL is so that you can log into the back-end of your newly created website.  In our sample site, the URL to the WordPress site is sgtutorials.com/newwp/ and the Administrative login page can be found at sgtutorials.com/newwp/wp-admin/ as shown below.

If you forget to write them down, don’t worry, WordPress will automatically send you an e-mail notification with your Login credentials, including the front-end URL and the back-end URL.

 

How to Install the Divi Theme

Once you have installed WordPress, you are now ready to install the Divi Theme.  However, you first need to get the Divi Theme by downloading it from the members area of Elegant Themes.

After having purchased either the annual subscription for $89, or buying the lifetime access (better value for the money), you will need to Login to your account, and then look for the “Divi” theme in the DOWNLOADS tab. From there, click the “DOWNLOAD” button to get the zipped theme folder, as shown below.

 

 

Now, let’s go back to your WordPress dashboard.  Follow the steps listed below to install the “Divi Theme” that you just downloaded from Elegant Themes.

  1. Click the APPEARANCES > THEMES tab to open up the Themes page.
  2. Click the “ADD NEW” button at the top of the screen.
  3. The next screen will display, the “UPLOAD THEME” button on the top of the page. You will then be brought to a new page with an upload link.
  4. Click the “CHOOSE FILE” button which will open up a new window allowing you to browse your computer to locate the Divi.zip file that you just download from the members area on the ElegantThemes.com website.  Now select that file.  Once you have selected the file, the window will close.
  5. Click the “INSTALL NOW” button to install your theme.
  6. In a minute or so, the page will re-load, and after the theme has been successfully uploaded, you will be presented with an “ACTIVATE THEME” link.
  7. Click the Divi Theme to activate your theme and complete the installation.

That’s all there is to it!  If you now visit the front end of your website, it will look very plain, as expected.  This is because you now have a completely blank canvas to paint your creativity on.  You should now visit the back-end of your website, (www.yourdomain.com/wp-admin), and enter your login credentials to start the process of building your new website with Divi, which is exactly what we will do in Part 3 of our series.